‘God Will. God Always Has’

Editor’s Note: The following Lectionary to Life reflection, based on Psalm 145: 8-14, was written by Loretta Fulton for the Center for Congregational Ethics Facebook page. It was posted July 3. The center was founded by Bill Tillman, former ethics professor at the Logsdon School of Theology at Hardin-Simmons University.

Psalm 145: 8-14, the appointed reading for today, is one of those Psalms that just feels good and right. It is filled with praise for a God who is “gracious and compassionate, slow to anger and rich in love.”

It praises the Lord who is good to all, “he has compassion on all he has made.” The Lord’s works praise him, his faithful people extol him. 

This Psalm is so uplifting and beautifully written, in fact, that it seems out of place for July 3, 2020, the year of COVID -19 and, more recently, social unrest in the aftermath of seemingly endless killings of black Americans, many at the hands of police. 

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s famed “I Have a Dream” speech, delivered Aug. 28, 1963, contained the well-known words from the prophet Amos, Chapter 5, Verse 24: “But let justice roll down like waters, and righteousness like an ever-flowing stream.” 

And King cited the prophet Isaiah, Chapter 40: 4, “Every valley shall be exalted,

and every mountain and hill shall be made low.”

On June 9 of this year, the Rev. Al Sharpton delivered the eulogy at the funeral of George Floyd, who died May 25 after a Minneapolis police officer pressed his knee to Floyd’s neck for more than eight minutes. In his eulogy, Sharpton used the word “justice” several times:

“There’s going to be justice for George Floyd…This story won’t end like this. God will never leave us, nor forsake us…”

And, Sharpton said, “God will. God always has. He’ll make a way for his children.”

The appointed Psalm for today ends with these words:

“The Lord upholds all who fall 

and lifts up all who are bowed down.”

Maybe this Psalm isn’t out of place on July 3, 2020. 

Loretta Fulton is a freelance writer in Abilene and editor of Spirit of Abilene, an online faith forum. 

Today’s Lectionary to Life reflection “God Will. God Always Has” is from Psalm 145 and comes from Loretta Fulton.

Psalm 145: 8-14, the appointed reading for today, is one of those Psalms that just feels good and right. It is filled with praise for a God who is “gracious and compassionate, slow to anger and rich in love.”

It praises the Lord who is good to all, “he has compassion on all he has made.” The Lord’s works praise him, his faithful people extol him. 

This Psalm is so uplifting and beautifully written, in fact, that it seems out of place for July 3, 2020, the year of COVID -19 and, more recently, social unrest in the aftermath of seemingly endless killings of black Americans, many at the hands of police. 

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s famed “I Have a Dream” speech, delivered Aug. 28, 1963, contained the well-known words from the prophet Amos, Chapter 5, Verse 24: “But let justice roll down like waters, and righteousness like an ever-flowing stream.” 

And King cited the prophet Isaiah, Chapter 40: 4, “Every valley shall be exalted,

and every mountain and hill shall be made low.”

On June 9 of this year, the Rev. Al Sharpton delivered the eulogy at the funeral of George Floyd, who died May 25 after a Minneapolis police officer pressed his knee to Floyd’s neck for more than eight minutes. In his eulogy, Sharpton used the word “justice” several times:

“There’s going to be justice for George Floyd…This story won’t end like this. God will never leave us, nor forsake us…”

And, Sharpton said, “God will. God always has. He’ll make a way for his children.”

The appointed Psalm for today ends with these words:

“The Lord upholds all who fall 

and lifts up all who are bowed down.”

Maybe this Psalm isn’t out of place on July 3, 2020. 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.